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Posts Tagged ‘SQL Server 2016’

Simple Guide to restore SQL Server Backup from Azure Blog Storage using Management Studio

November 6, 2017 Leave a comment

In previous post, we saw

1. How to implement Off-site/Cloud backup in SQL Server 2017 using Azure Blob Storage

2. How to restore SQL Server Backup from Azure Blog Storage using queries

In this post we will see how to restore SQL Server Backup from Azure Blog Storage using SQL Server Management Studio

Step 1: Open SQL Server Management Studio 2017 and connect to SQL Server on which you would like restore the database and right click on “Databases” node and click on “Restore Database…

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Step 2: Select Backup media type as “URL” and click on “Add

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Step 3: Click “Add” to add the new Azure Storage container

capture20171030134514751

If you are not already signed in, sign in to Azure account and then select the Subscription, Storage account and blob container

Based on you requirement, set up the Expiration date for Shared Access policy, by default, its setup for 1 year from date of setup

Click on “Create Credential” to generate the Shared Access Signature (SAS), once SAS is generated successfully, click “Ok” to continue

capture20171030141847722

Step 4: Please review the selected Azure Storage Container and Shared Access Signature and click “Ok” to continue

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Please select the backup file, you wish to restore

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Please review the selected backup media and click “Ok” to continue

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Step 5: Based on requirement change other options in Files tab or Options tab and click “Ok” to start the restore process

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Once restore is completed, we should see this restored successfully message

capture20171030143049123

We should also be able to see the database restored in Object Explorer as well

capture20171031191639786

Hope you find this post helpful !!!

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Simple guide to restore SQL Server Backup from Azure Blog Storage

November 1, 2017 1 comment

In previous post, we saw How to implement Off-site/Cloud backup in SQL Server 2017 using Azure Blob Storage, in this post we will see how to restore SQL Server Backup from Azure Blog Storage

Step 1: Create Credential – Please use below query to create Credential to access Azure Blog Storage using Shared Access Signature, This step is optional if you already have created Credential to create backup

CREATE CREDENTIAL [https://XYZ.blob.core.windows.net/YourContainerName]
WITH IDENTITY = 'SHARED ACCESS SIGNATURE',
SECRET =
 'sv=Replace your SAS Key Here';
GO

Step 2: Restore Database from Cloud (Azure Blog Storage) – Please run below query to restore the database using SQL Server Backup stored in Azure Blog Storage, Please change the query to meet your needs

USE [master]

RESTORE DATABASE [SQL2017_DEMO]
FROM
     URL = N'https://XYZ.blob.core.windows.net/YourContainerName/BackupFile.bak'
WITH  FILE = 1,
MOVE N'SQL2017_DEMO' TO N'E:\SQLDATA\SQL2017_DEMO.mdf',
MOVE N'SQL2017_DEMO_log' TO N'E:\SQLDATA\SQL2017_DEMO_log.ldf',
NOUNLOAD,
STATS = 5

GO

Output:

capture20171031191608492

We can also see the database restored in Object Explorer

capture20171031191639786

Hope you find this post helpful !!!

Simple Guide to implement Off-Site/Cloud backup in SQL Server 2017 using Azure Blob Storage in 2 Steps

October 31, 2017 2 comments

In this post we will see how to implement Off-Site/Cloud backup in SQL Server 2017 using Azure Blog Storage

Requirements

1. SQL Server 2017

2. Azure Account

3. Azure Blog Storage with Container provisioned and Shared Access Signature generated

4. SQL Server Management Studio (Optional, if you prefer to run using SQLCMD)

 

Step 1: Create Credential – Please use below query to create Credential to access Azure Blob Storage using Shared Access Signature

CREATE CREDENTIAL [https://sqlxpertise.blob.core.windows.net/sqlbackups]
	WITH IDENTITY = 'SHARED ACCESS SIGNATURE',
SECRET =
	'sv=INSERT YOUR SHARED ACCESS SIGNATURE';
GO

 

Step 2: Backup Database to Cloud – Run below query to backup the database to Azure Blob Storage, Please change the query to meet your needs

BACKUP DATABASE SQL2017_DEMO
    TO URL = 'https://XYZ.blob.core.windows.net/sqlbackups/BackupFileName.bak'
    WITH STATS = 10, SKIP, NOREWIND, NOUNLOAD

 

Output:

capture20171030101644076

If we login to Azure Portal and Navigate to the Storage account and sqlbackups container, we can see the backup file

capture20171030104711661

You can also use SQL Server Management studio 2017 to connect to Azure Storage as well to see the backup file

capture20171030104822250

Having an offsite backup is always important and helpful.

Hope you find this post helpful !!!

Temporal Tables – Part 5- Simple Guide to implement History Tables using SQL Server 2016/2017– Storing History data in Azure using Stretch Database

October 25, 2017 Leave a comment

In previous posts, we saw

Part 1 – How to create Temporal Tables

Part 2 – Accessing History data from Temporal Tables

Part 3 – Modifying Temporal Tables, Disabling System versioning and why we need to disable ?

Part 4 – Managing Temporal Tables and History Data

In this post we will see how to store the history data in Azure using Stretch database

Step 1: Right click on Database name and click on Tasks –> Stretch –> Enable

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Step 2: Select the tables which you would like to enable Stretch

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Step 3: Click on “Entire Table” hyperlink in Migrate column to customize the criteria for Stretch, by default the Entire table will be stored in SQL Azure

Please specify the name of the Stretch Criteria, Please select the Column based on which you want to apply the filter criteria , select the Condition and then specify the value

capture20171023145208563

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After specify the criteria, click on “Check” to validate, once you “Success”, Please click “Done” to continue

Step 4:  Please review the selected tables and click “Next” to continue

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Step 5: Please sign in to your Azure account, if you are not already signed in, Please select the Subscription, Azure region

We can create a new SQL Azure server or use an existing server, in this demo I am using an existing server

After providing details, click “Next” to continue

capture20171023145308669

Step 6: Please provide the Public IP Address range for which you need to enable access, If you have only one Public IP Address, Please specify that for both From and To and then click Next to proceed

FYI, If you created a new server, by default this step will enable the Firewall for Azure services

capture20171023145338248

Step 7: Review the settings selected and also review the estimated Pricing, this will change based on the number of tables and size of data you are planning to store in SQL Azure

Please click “Finish” to start the Stretch enabling process

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We can review the Stretch deployment process in below screenshot, based on your selecting, the steps shown below can change

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Once all the steps are completed, we can see status as “Passed”, if you want to see the verbose details on what happened in each step, we can review the Logs, To access the logs, Please click on Hyperlink, This will be very helpful when there is any error occurred

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How to monitor Stretch databases ?

We can now see the Icon for the database has changed

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To monitor the progress of Stretch, Please right click on Database Name –> Tasks –> Stretch –> Monitor

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In Monitor window, we can see the Source server, Target Azure server, Database and list of tables being stretched and number of rows uploaded

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We can also connect to the SQL Azure server and access the history data as shown below

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How to disable Stretch for a particular table / database ?

To disable Stretch for a table, right click on table name –> Stretch –> Disable

You have 2 options

1. Bring data back from Azure – This will download all the data from SQL Azure and update your local server

2. Leave data in Azure – This will leave the data as is in SQL Azure server and new data will be stored locally

Please choose the option based on your requirement

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In this demo, we are using “Bring data back from Azure” option, Please click “Yes” to confirm the disable process

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Depending on the size of the data, the process will run and you will see the below message

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After disabling Stretch on all the tables, we can disable the Stretch at the database level by right clicking on Database name –> Tasks –> Stretch –> Disable

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FYI, If you try disabling the Stretch in your database, before disabling Stretch in the tables, you will see this below validation message

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Once the Stretch disable process is completed, we will see this below completed message

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FYI, You can use the Stretch option not just for Temporal History tables, you can use this for any other tables where you want to store historical data or least accessed data remotely for reference or compliance purposes

Hope you find this post helpful !!!

Temporal Tables–Simple Guide to implement History Tables using SQL Server 2016/2017–Part 4–Managing Temporal Tables and History Data

October 24, 2017 1 comment

In previous posts, we saw

Part 1 – How to create Temporal Tables

Part 2 – Accessing History data from Temporal Tables

Part 3 – Modifying Temporal Tables, Disabling System versioning and why we need to disable ?

In this post we will see how to manage Temporal tables and History

To get list of Temporal Tables – Snippet 1

SELECT name,
       object_id,
       temporal_type,
       temporal_type_desc,
       history_table_id,
       is_remote_data_archive_enabled,
       is_external,
       history_retention_period,
       history_retention_period_unit,
       history_retention_period_unit_desc
FROM sys.tables
WHERE temporal_type > 0
ORDER BY name;

 

Output

capture20171023102432733

If we see the output, we can identify the following

1. Type of Temporal Table – System Versioned or History table using “temporal_type” and “temporal_type_desc” columns

2. For System Versioned tables, we can also see the History Table ID

3. History Retention Period can be determined using history_retention_period, history_retention_period_unit and history_retention_period_unit_desc

history_retention_period = -1  = History is kept forever

Positive Integer = Refers to the number of Days/Weeks/Years

history_retention_period_unit will have one of these values

-1 = INFINITE

3 = DAY(S)

4 = WEEK(S)

5 = MONTH(S)

6 = YEAR(S)

By default, when we create temporal tables, if we don’t specify Retention period, it will be created with Infinite period of retention

Modifying Retention Period

Let us see how we can change Retention Period for an existing Temporal Table

Code to alter table to set Retention Period for 2 days – Snippet 2

ALTER TABLE dbo.Demo
	SET (SYSTEM_VERSIONING = ON
			(
				HISTORY_TABLE = dbo.DemoHistory,
				HISTORY_RETENTION_PERIOD = 2 DAYS
			)
		)

If we run query from Snippet 1, we will see below output

capture20171023103757653

To get list of Databases with Retention Enabled – Snippet 3

Once retention period is enabled for any table in the database, SQL Server will set the is_temporal_history_retention_enabled flag = 1 for the database by default and also create background jobs to cleanup the history data

SELECT name,
       database_id,
       is_temporal_history_retention_enabled
FROM sys.databases
WHERE is_temporal_history_retention_enabled = 1
ORDER BY name;

Output

capture20171023104055758

If you want to disable automatic cleanup task, Please use below command

Query to disable cleanup task – Snippet 4

ALTER DATABASE SQL2017_DEMO
     SET TEMPORAL_HISTORY_RETENTION OFF

If we run the query in Snippet 3, we can see the changes

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How to cleanup History tables manually ?

If you prefer to cleanup the History tables manually rather than automated, Please follow below steps

1. Make your application offline

2. Run query to disable System versioning on required tables

3. Run query to delete data from History using SysEndTime as Filter criteria

4. Run query to enable System versioning for tables disabled in Step 2

5. Make your application online

If your application has to be on 24/7, better option is to use the in-built automated cleanup task

Hope you find this post helpful !!!

Temporal Tables – Simple Guide to implement History Tables using SQL Server 2016/2017–Part 3–Modifying Temporal Tables, Disabling System Versioning and why we need to disable

October 23, 2017 2 comments

Part 1 – How to create Temporal tables

Part 2 – Accessing History data from Temporal Tables

In this post we will how to modify Temporal Tables, How to disable System Versioning in Temporal tables to update large set data of without affecting history or truncate tables

Modifying Temporal Tables

For adding new columns to Temporal tables, Please use below command

ALTER TABLE dbo.Demo ADD DemoDesc VARCHAR(255) NULL

Screenshot before adding the new column

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Screenshot after adding the new column – If we notice, adding the column in the main table automatically modifies the history table as well

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Similarly we can modify the tables to drop column or increasing the size of the field, but some of the changes to table are not supported ex. Adding Identify column or changing the data type of the field which is not supported using implicit conversion, in that scenario we need to disable the system versioning to make changes

Disable System Versioning

Screenshot before disabling system versioning

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Script to disable system versioning

ALTER TABLE dbo.Demo	SET (SYSTEM_VERSIONING = OFF);

Screenshot after disabling system versioning – If we notice the System versioning is disabled and both Main and history table is displayed as regular tables now

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There are other scenarios we need to disable System versioning, if we need to do any of the following operations

1. TRUNCATE TABLE on Main or History table

Msg 13545, Level 16, State 1, Line 1
Truncate failed on table ‘SQL2017_DEMO.dbo.Demo’ because it is not a supported operation on system-versioned tables.

2. Deleting rows from History table

Msg 13560, Level 16, State 1, Line 4
Cannot delete rows from a temporal history table ‘SQL2017_DEMO.dbo.DemoHistory’.

3. Dropping Main or History table

Msg 13552, Level 16, State 1, Line 6
Drop table operation failed on table ‘SQL2017_DEMO.dbo.Demo’ because it is not a supported operation on system-versioned temporal tables.

Hope you find this post helpful !!!

Temporal Tables–Simple Guide to implement History Tables using SQL Server 2016/2017–Part 2–Accessing History data

October 21, 2017 3 comments

In previous post, we saw how to create Temporal tables or enable System Versioning on an existing table

In this post, we will review how to access History data

Using below code, we will create simple Temporal table and inserted 5 records and querying both the Main and History table

CREATE TABLE dbo.Demo 
 (    
      DemoID int NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED  IDENTITY 
    , DemoName varchar(50) NOT NULL  
    , SysStartTime datetime2 GENERATED ALWAYS AS ROW START NOT NULL  
    , SysEndTime datetime2 GENERATED ALWAYS AS ROW END NOT NULL  
    , PERIOD FOR SYSTEM_TIME (SysStartTime,SysEndTime)     
 )    
 WITH (SYSTEM_VERSIONING = ON (HISTORY_TABLE = dbo.DemoHistory)) 
 ;

INSERT INTO dbo.Demo (DemoName) VALUES ('Demo1') 
 INSERT INTO dbo.Demo (DemoName) VALUES ('Demo2') 
 INSERT INTO dbo.Demo (DemoName) VALUES ('Demo3') 
 INSERT INTO dbo.Demo (DemoName) VALUES ('Demo4') 
 INSERT INTO dbo.Demo (DemoName) VALUES ('Demo5')

SELECT DemoID, 
        DemoName, 
        SysStartTime, 
        SysEndTime FROM dbo.Demo

SELECT DemoID, 
        DemoName, 
        SysStartTime, 
        SysEndTime FROM dbo.DemoHistory

 

Output: Main table has 5 rows and and History has no data, because no changes were made yet to the data, Also if you notice the SysEndTime, all of them are set to 12/31/9999 23:59:59.9999999, which refer to them as current record

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Let us modify some data in 2 minute intervals

First Change – Update 1 row and delete 1 row

UPDATE dbo.Demo 
    SET DemoName='Demo11' 
    WHERE DemoID=1

DELETE FROM dbo.Demo WHERE DemoID=4

Output: Now we can see that Main table has 4 rows and History has 2 rows , the green highlighted is the record we updated as you can history table contains the previous version of record and also SysEndTime in History table indicates when it was updated

Similarly Red highlighted record in history is the deleted with Deleted time

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Second Update: Update 1 record and Delete 1 record

UPDATE dbo.Demo 
    SET DemoName='Demo12' 
    WHERE DemoID=2

DELETE FROM dbo.Demo WHERE DemoID=3

Output:

capture20171020121832704

Let us now review how we can access the History data

Method 1: AS OF

We can use FOR SYSTEM_TIME AS OF to get records in Demo as of the specific time, This will be helpful for scenarios when you want to see How much Inventory was in hand as of a particular date and time or What products were in hand as of particular date and time

In below example we are using 3 different time with 2 minute intervals

SELECT DemoID, 
       DemoName, 
       SysStartTime, 
        SysEndTime FROM dbo.Demo 
    FOR SYSTEM_TIME AS OF '2017-10-20 14:42:34' 
    ORDER BY DemoID

SELECT DemoID, 
       DemoName, 
       SysStartTime, 
       SysEndTime FROM dbo.Demo 
    FOR SYSTEM_TIME AS OF '2017-10-20 14:44:34' 
    ORDER BY DemoID

SELECT DemoID, 
       DemoName, 
        SysStartTime, 
       SysEndTime FROM dbo.Demo 
    FOR SYSTEM_TIME AS OF '2017-10-20 14:46:34' 
    ORDER BY DemoID

Output: As we can see in first output we are able to see all records as how it was inserted and in 2nd put, we can see 1st record was updated and Demo ID 4 record is missing and in output 3 23 can seem Demo ID 1 and 2 are updated and 3 and 4 are deleted

capture20171020122217154

Method 2: FROM…TO and  BETWEEN…AND option

We can use FROM…TO and BETWEEN…AND option to get records changed between 2 specified date times

SELECT DemoID, 
       DemoName, 
       SysStartTime, 
       SysEndTime 
    FROM dbo.Demo 
    FOR SYSTEM_TIME FROM '2017-10-20 14:42:33' TO '2017-10-20 14:46:55' 
    ORDER BY DemoID, SysStartTime

SELECT DemoID, 
        DemoName, 
       SysStartTime, 
       SysEndTime 
    FROM dbo.Demo 
    FOR SYSTEM_TIME BETWEEN '2017-10-20 14:42:33' AND '2017-10-20 14:46:55' 
    ORDER BY DemoID, SysStartTime

 

Output: In below output you can see all changes made between the specified time intervals, but if you notice it, its providing us both version of the records, so based on your application need, you will need to use this or else, it might provide more records for display than you need

capture20171020123046024

Method 3: CONTAINED IN

When we use CONTAINED IN option, it provides data from history table only for the specified datetime(s)

SELECT DemoID, 
        DemoName, 
        SysStartTime, 
       SysEndTime 
    FROM dbo.Demo 
    FOR SYSTEM_TIME CONTAINED IN ('2017-10-20 14:42:33', '2017-10-20 14:45:56') 
    ORDER BY DemoID, SysStartTime

 

Output: As we can see the below output doesn’t contain the current version of record or other records from Main table

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Method 4: ALL

When we use ALL option, it provides data from both Main and History table for all the changes made so far

SELECT DemoID, 
        DemoName, 
        SysStartTime, 
       SysEndTime FROM dbo.Demo 
    FOR SYSTEM_TIME ALL 
    ORDER BY DemoID, SysStartTime

Output

We can see all records from main and history table combined, Please be cautious using this option when running without Filter criteria for larger tables

capture20171020123659353

We can create Views using Temporal Tables and those views supports these clauses as well

Hope you find this post helpful !!!

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